Running XAMPP on Ubuntu using Terminal

To start XAMPP run the following and the command will return a list of running services:

sudo /opt/lampp/lampp start

To stop XAMPP run the command below and it will return a list of the stopped services.

sudo /opt/lampp/lampp stop

You can also stop/start/restart individual services by appending “apache”, “mysql” or “ftp” to the end.

Starting

start – Start XAMPP (Apache, MySQL and eventually others)
startapache – Start only Apache
startmysql – Start only MySQL
startftp – Start only ProFTPD

Stopping

stop – Stop XAMPP (Apache, MySQL and eventually others)
stopapache – Stop only Apache
stopmysql – Stop only MySQL
stopftp – Stop only ProFTPD

Restart

reload – Reload XAMPP (Apache, MySQL and eventually others)
reloadapache – Reload only Apache
reloadmysql – Reload only MySQL
reloadftp – Reload only ProFTPD
restart – Stop and start XAMPP

SSL & Security

security – Check XAMPP’s security
enablessl – Enable SSL support for Apache
disablessl – Disable SSL support for Apache

Config

backup – Make backup file of your XAMPP config, log and data files
oci8 – Enable the oci8 extenssion

GUI Panel

panel – Starts graphical XAMPP control panel

Enable Magento2 Command-Line Interface (CLI) on Linux

For both development, ongoing management and scheduled tasks Magento’s Command Line Interface is able to do it all.

To enable CLI for Magento to you’ll need to make sure the file /bin/magento is executable by the system.

If you’re on the server SSH into the root of your Magneto install and run the command

chmod +x bin/magento

If you’re on desktop simply locate the file in your file explorer, right click and set the “Allow executing file as program” checkbox on the Permissions tab.

Running Ubuntu on Windows

One of my favourite aspects of Windows 10 has been the Linux subsystem for Windows.

I’ve been using it since launch partly because it sounded cool but also because a majority of my development projects are Linux based and when I’m interacting with a server I use Bash, a command line interface for Linux.

Day to day usefulness

As someone who daily has to interact with various servers it makes sense to use bash everywhere. On Windows with the Linux subsystem, you can Bash scripts, use command-line tools like sed, awk, grep, and you can even run Linux-first tools like Ruby, Git, Python, etc. directly on Windows.

You have complete access to your existing Windows filesystem from within Bash allowing you to work on the same set of files using both Windows applications and Linux command-line tools.

Desktop experiments

On the experimental side and with the addition of a window manager Xming X Server I have been able to run Linux applications such as Open Office, Firefox and Tor Browser from within the Linux subsystem on Windows.